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This blog is dedicated to music, films, and books that fall under into the public domain.
Because the best things don't need copyright

skunkbear:

So photographer David Slater wants Wikipedia to remove a monkey selfie that was taken with his camera. As you can see from this screen shot, Wikipedia says no: the monkey pressed the shutter so it owns the copyright.

We got NPR’s in-house legal counsel, Ashley Messenger, to weigh in. She said:

Traditional interpretation of copyright law is that the person who captured the image owns the copyright. That would be the monkey. The photographer’s best argument is that the monkey took the photo at his direction and therefore it’s work for hire. But that’s not a great argument because it’s not clear the monkey had the intent to work at the direction of the photographer nor is it clear there was “consideration” (value) exchanged for the work. So… It’s definitely an interesting question! Or the photographer could argue that leaving the camera to see what would happen is his work an therefore the monkey’s capture of the image was really the photographer’s art, but that would be a novel approach, to my knowledge.

(via cognitivedissonance)

2 weeks ago
6,343 notes

stateofdrought:

From NASA’s Earth Observatory, the image of the day for Sunday, Aug. 3 is an infrared view of what’s happened to two relatively obscure California reservoirs (Hensley Lake and H.V. Eastman Lake) between April 2011 (top) and now. 

Check out the Earth Observatory home page for more information on the images (and a gallery of other pictures, drought-related and otherwise).

(via cognitivedissonance)

3 weeks ago
57 notes

okkultmotionpictures:

EXCERPTS >|< Photographic Studies in Hypnosis: Abnormal Psychology (1937)


 | Hosted at: Internet Archive
 | From: Prelinger Archives
 | Download: Ogg | h.264 | MPEG4
 | Digital Copy: not specified


A series of Animated GIFs excerpted from Photographic Studies in Hypnosis: Abnormal Psychology, a video showing a female subject under hypnosis and responding to post-hypnotic suggestions. A silent film from Prelinger Archives.

We invite you to watch the full video HERE.




EXCERPTS by OKKULT Motion Pictures: a collection of GIFs excerpted from out-of-copyright/historical/rare/controversial moving images. 
A digital curation project for the diffusion of open knowledge.

>|<

2 months ago
643 notes

notions-of-limburger:

Tough to budge.

W.B. Yeats : Ideas of Good  and Evil

Sandow on Physical training and the perfect human form

(via internetarchive)

3 months ago
29 notes

Amyntas led me to a Grove,
Where all the Trees did shade us;
The Sun it self, though it had Strove,
It could not have betray’d us:
The place secur’d from humane Eyes,
No other fear allows,
But when the Winds that gently rise,
Doe Kiss the yielding Boughs.

Down there we satt upon the Moss,
And did begin to play
A Thousand Amorous Tricks, to pass
The heat of all the day.
A many Kisses he did give:
And I return’d the same
Which made me willing to receive
That which I dare not name.
His Charming Eyes no Aid requir’d
To tell their softning Tale;
On her that was already fir’d,
‘Twas Easy to prevaile.
He did but Kiss and Clasp me round,
Whilst those his thoughts Exprest:
And lay’d me gently on the Ground:
Ah who can guess the rest?

The Willing Mistress

by Aphra Behn

PoemHunter.com

3 months ago
22 notes

design-is-fine:

Palm’s Patent Transfer Letters, Ornaments and Trade Design, sample book, 1901. USA. Complete book via OpenLibrary.

Letters for Wood, Metal, Paint, Glass, for Wagons, Cars, Safes, Electric Cars, Railroad Cars, for Trade Signs and Monograms. 

(via broadcastarchive-umd)

3 weeks ago
323 notes

danyellekhmara said: Are Christmas songs such as Frosty the Snowman and Santa Clause is Coming to Town public domain?

Some but not others. Frosty the Snowman (1950) and Santa Clause is Coming to Town (1932) were written fairly recently, especially in copyright years. A lot of these cutesy songs (including Rudolf and Winter Wonderland were written for advertising companies, and so the rights belong to their prospective stores. Still, a lot of songs like, Jingle Bells, We Wish You A Merry Christmas, and Silent Night are public domain. This website has a pretty good list. 

3 weeks ago
3 notes

baileylibrary:

"You owe it to your family and friends to have a Gram-o-phone in your home."

Taken from Scientific American, July-Dec 1899, located in the Bailey Library at Hendrix College.

(via broadcastarchive-umd)

2 months ago
41 notes
s-c-i-guy:

Saturn’s Rainbow Rings
This colourful cosmic rainbow portrays a section of Saturn’s beautiful rings, four centuries after they were discovered by Galileo Galilei.
Saturn’s rings were first observed in 1610. Despite using his newly created telescope, Galileo was confounded by what he saw: he referred to the peculiar shapes surrounding the planet as “Saturn’s children”. Only later did Christiaan Huygens propose that the mysterious shapes were actually rings orbiting the planet. These were named in the order in which they were discovered, using the first seven letters of the alphabet: the D-ring is closest to the planet, followed by C, B, A, F, G and E.
The data for this image, which shows the portion of the C-ring closest to Saturn on the left, with the B-ring beginning just right of centre, were acquired by Cassini’s Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph, or UVIS, as the spacecraft entered into orbit around Saturn on 30 June 2004.
UVIS, as its name suggests, carries out observations in ultraviolet wavelengths. During the Saturn orbit insertion manoeuvre, when Cassini flew closest to the rings, UVIS could resolve features up to 97 km across. The region shown in this image spans about 10 000 km.
The variation in the colour of the rings arises from the differences in their composition. Turquoise-hued rings contain particles of nearly pure water ice, whereas reddish rings contain ice particles with more contaminants.
Saturn’s prominent and complex ensemble of rings is the best studied in the Solar System, but it is still not known how the rings formed. One suggestion is that they formed at the same time as the planet and that they are as old as the Solar System. Another idea is that they formed when icy material was pulled from another body into Saturn’s gravitational field, in which case the rings could be younger than the planet.
One thing is sure: as Cassini searches for answers it is providing amazing images of these rainbow rings.
Image Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Colorado
source

s-c-i-guy:

Saturn’s Rainbow Rings

This colourful cosmic rainbow portrays a section of Saturn’s beautiful rings, four centuries after they were discovered by Galileo Galilei.

Saturn’s rings were first observed in 1610. Despite using his newly created telescope, Galileo was confounded by what he saw: he referred to the peculiar shapes surrounding the planet as “Saturn’s children”. Only later did Christiaan Huygens propose that the mysterious shapes were actually rings orbiting the planet. These were named in the order in which they were discovered, using the first seven letters of the alphabet: the D-ring is closest to the planet, followed by C, B, A, F, G and E.

The data for this image, which shows the portion of the C-ring closest to Saturn on the left, with the B-ring beginning just right of centre, were acquired by Cassini’s Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph, or UVIS, as the spacecraft entered into orbit around Saturn on 30 June 2004.

UVIS, as its name suggests, carries out observations in ultraviolet wavelengths. During the Saturn orbit insertion manoeuvre, when Cassini flew closest to the rings, UVIS could resolve features up to 97 km across. The region shown in this image spans about 10 000 km.

The variation in the colour of the rings arises from the differences in their composition. Turquoise-hued rings contain particles of nearly pure water ice, whereas reddish rings contain ice particles with more contaminants.

Saturn’s prominent and complex ensemble of rings is the best studied in the Solar System, but it is still not known how the rings formed. One suggestion is that they formed at the same time as the planet and that they are as old as the Solar System. Another idea is that they formed when icy material was pulled from another body into Saturn’s gravitational field, in which case the rings could be younger than the planet.

One thing is sure: as Cassini searches for answers it is providing amazing images of these rainbow rings.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Colorado

source

(via n-a-s-a)

3 months ago
869 notes